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dfs Crufts: Celebrity-Designed dog collars go under the Hammer for Charity

dog collar designed by Anthony HeadForget celebrity perfume, dog collars are the new ‘it’ thing. Having starred as the Prime Minister in Little Britain, actor Anthony Head now joins a host of British celebrities, including Julian Clary and Kate Silverton who have each designed a dog collar in aid of the Kennel Club Charitable Trust.

Each dog collar reflects the individual’s personality and Dr Lance Workman, a Psychologist at Bath Spa University has taken time to look into what each collar says about the designer. Dr Workman said of Julian Clary’s design: “Bold use of red and white – a simple but effective design. The red suggests an up-beat person but tempered by the softer white. I note the white pearl strings project beyond the borders making this less functional and more decorative than most of the others. Perhaps a little flamboyant of nature? A man - but a gentle man.”

The dog collars, donated by stylish dog accessory company Holly & Lil, will be auctioned at dfs Crufts, with all proceeds going to the Kennel Club Charitable Trust. Each collar is completely unique and they vary in size, so that any dog from a Chihuahua to a Great Dane can strut their stuff in celebrity style.

Anthony Head, whose daughter Emily (Carli in The Inbetweeners) also designed a dog collar, said:”As a dog lover it is great to be given the opportunity to do something fun that also helps dogs. I think we have all tried to express our personalities through the design. The Kennel Club Charitable Trust does great work in helping breed rescue organisations rehome unwanted dogs and providing funds to find cures for dog diseases, so I really hope that the collars raise a lot of money for the cause.”

Some other celebrities who have designed the collars include:
Kate Silverton (BBC newsreader)
David Spinx (formerly Keith Miller in Eastenders)
Jeremy Hackett (designer and founder of clothing brand, Hackett)
JoAnne Good (BBC Barking at the Moon presenter)

All of the celebrities involved are known dog lovers and were more than enthusiastic to help raise money for dogs. Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary said: “This is a unique chance to own a bespoke dog collar designed and hand made by a celebrity. They are all very creative and will look great on their four-legged owners. We are hoping for a competitive auction at dfs Crufts, which will help the Kennel Club Charitable Trust to continue making a difference to dogs’ lives.”

The Kennel Club Charitable Trust was established in 1987 and has donated over £5m to a range of organisations and charities, with more than half of this money distributed in the last five years.

The Trust awards grants to organisations to help them to achieve its objective of 'making a difference for dogs' and supports work with dogs across three distinct areas:
·        Science - funding research into health problems in dogs
·        Support - helping to train dogs to help human beings
·        Welfare - providing funds for dogs that need help or rescue

The auction will go online at http://tinyurl.com/kennelclubcharitabletrust on Thursday 10th March 2011.

ENDS
[088.11]
9th March 2011

Notes to Editors

Dr Lance Workman’s analysis of each dog collar:

Anthony Head
Turquoise collar with green white and red florets between wave-like little white pearls. This is someone who takes time to do things properly. It is very ordered and pleasing to the eye. I would say probably a calm man with a great deal of patience and authority.

Julian Clary
Bold use of red and white – a simple but effective design. The red suggests an up-beat person but tempered by the softer white. I note the white pearl strings project beyond the borders making this less functional and more decorative than most of the others. Perhaps a little flamboyant of nature? A man - but a gentle man.

Kate Silverton
Blue with just two ‘accoutrements’ (gold and silver florets). Very much the minimalist. A calm person who does not like clutter. Likes to be organised and complete tasks successfully.

Jeremy Hackett
A brown collar with red and green florets and silver stars. Again brown is a very masculine colour – the use of red and green is unusual suggesting an individual that likes to break the barriers of convention and one that has a unique take on blending of colours. Unconventional all round.

Emily Head
A white collar covered with gold and silver stars – well-ordered with good spacing. This is very much a feminine person – but given it is quite minimalistic – a no-nonsense person.

David Spinx
The brown collar is suggestive of a masculine earthy disposition suggesting a strong but reliable person. But this is counterbalanced by the wide variety of colours and shapes that this individual has used (gold, green, purple, red). A real mixture of colour and shape. Despite this it’s not overloaded suggesting an ordered mind.       

JoAnne Good
Pink collar with a very wide range of colour and shape (including purple, green red and orange). Most of the shapes are quite floral. I can imagine this person is feminine but a non-conformer in her femininity. A ‘take me as you find me’ individual but nonetheless a feminine one.

Judith Summers
Light blue collar with a small number of white stars surrounded by little green florets. One of the more stylish and minimalist creations. Light blue is peaceful and tranquil and the white parts are not overstated. Probably a person of sophistication with a light touch and a calm, ‘know your own mind’ temperament.

Julian Bennett
Wow! Very much in your face this design – no minimalism here. Pink collar overloaded with gold trinkets and a range of colours (red, yellow, green and purple) and shapes.  The sort of person who just has too many ideas for their own good! Very creative but perhaps with a tendency to jump from one idea to another. Someone who is hard to keep up with.

Anna Webb
Purple with purple and silver florets. Very good colour coordination probably the most easy on the eye of all of them. Purple is said to reflect luxury and sophistication, the precision of the patterning and coordinated colours might also suggest a high level of sophistication.

3/9/2011